Practicing Presence

Late in college, I sat in student housing in Seattle with a fellow English major watching a movie for class. A fall storm moved in and once the movie was over, the rain fell thick on the roof of the second story apartment, the windows vibrating from thunderclap. With a head full of Byron, Shelley, and Keats, I had a sudden impulse. Let’s go for a walk!

Practicing Presence

It was dark and cold and pouring. We’d be drenched. That, of course, was the point. To situate oneself into the experience of natural intensity, to experience it bodily, with the sense impression of the wet earth and grass, to feel the rain on the coat and the skin, to see it pass through streetlight or passing cars, to hear raindrops ricochet off the concrete. Here was an opportunity for a poetic moment, an intense experience. My companion was more pragmatic: Are you crazy? We’ll get soaked!

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Two Ways Of Engaging With Suffering

On a trip to visit an old friend recently, I stopped by the local bookstore to get some kind of keepsake, something I like to do on longer personal trips to mark the time. I noticed a new translation of a book I hadn’t read yet by one of my favorite authors, 19th century Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky, and picked it up.

Two Ways To Engage With Suffering

This particular book, Notes from a Dead House, is a fictionalized treatment of the author’s own experiences in a hard labor camp in Siberia. This was his commuted sentence after being granted a stay of execution from the Czar for being involved in a revolutionary group influenced by the writings of French utopian socialist Charles Fourier.

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A Dark Secret To Happiness?

I recently spent the weekend with an old friend who was going through a series of losses on several fronts. His grandmother, his mother, and his dog had died within a year, and he separated from his wife and was undergoing divorce proceedings.

A DARK SECRET TO HAPPINESS?

Meanwhile, there are two small children to take care of on a tight budget as he wraps up an advanced degree program. On the surface, the challenges seem overwhelming.

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The Three Hardest Things To Do In Life

As I write this, we’ve experienced maybe the craziest year in our national sports and politics with the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Chicago Cubs, Leicester City, Donald Trump, and now the New England Patriots coming back from extremely long odds to pull off improbable upsets.

The Three Hardest Things To Do In Life

As a nation that came into being by defying a global empire, we love to root for the scrappy underdog (ok, so the Pats weren’t an underdog going in, but down 19, a comeback seemed improbable). We value extreme competitors and achievers, whether in academics, business, politics, or sports. We value those hard-won victories.

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Do Contemplation And Resistance Go Together?

A couple weeks ago, I had to run some errands locally and my son was in the middle of a riveting episode of PJ Mask. I didn’t have time to wait until the end of the episode to leave and he was expectedly upset.

Contemplation and Resistance?

In the car ride he was emotional and determined to veto everything. No music! None of the lunch options are good! I’m not going to eat anything! We’re not going to do anything and we’re not going to go anywhere! In being upset he adopted a default resistance energy.

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What Exactly Is The Dark Night of the Soul?

In contemplative circles, whether spiritual formation, spiritual direction, or contemporary spirituality, one often comes across the phrase The Dark Night of the Soul. The phrase calls to mind a certain image and is fairly accessible to a modern mind on the surface.

What Exactly Is The Dark Night of the Soul?

But all too often it seems interchangeably used with terms like depression or suffering. We hear the phrase and automatically call to mind the worst time in our lives. Maybe we had to face a harsh reality, suffered deep and prolonged depression, or lost a loved one. But is that what this phrase refers to?

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The Feast of Epiphany and the Stages of Faith

The Feast of Epiphany is a celebration of the Journey of the Magi or the three wise men, popularized in Christmas nativity scenes and a bigger part of Catholic and Eastern traditions than, say, most Protestant faith expressions.

The Feast of Epiphany and the Stages of Faith

It’s a natural time to reflect on the process or journey and the changes we undergo as we move through stages of faith. I’ve written about these stages in a previous post, and these are usually articulated from a fairly macro level. Bernard of Clairvaux, for example, writes about four stages: loving self for self, loving God for self, loving God for God, and finally, loving self for God. And Janet Hagberg’s The Critical Journey outlining six stages is common reading in spiritual formation programs. But in this post I wanted to address the stages of faith from a more personal angle.

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Dancing Through Suffering

This was a unique Christmas season in my household, to say the least. As the culmination of multiple medical procedures, I had nasal reconstruction scheduled for a couple days before Christmas. A situation at my wife’s work caused her to take over for three Christmas Eve services and juggle duties looking after our four-year-old son.

Dancing Through Suffering

Somewhere in there, he caught a nasty cold, with bronchitis, fever and vomiting several times a night throughout the week. With packing in both nostrils and sleep apnea, the first nights following surgery it was virtually impossible to find a sleeping position, with no more than twenty minutes sleep at a stretch.

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Have Yourself A Sublime Little Christmas

Hey, in Germany they call it the second Christmas Day, so what the hey. I thought I’d drop a little note. So, there’s a phrase in the Judeo-Christian tradition that often gets translated as “the Fear of the Lord” as in “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom,” an understandable theological turn-off for many. After all, didn’t the angels show up in Bethlehem telling everyone to not be afraid? And isn’t there enough to be afraid of without making it a divine mandate? I should think so.

Have Yourself A Sublime Little Christmas

Interestingly, the original reads “Yirat Adonai,” much closer to an injunction for reverence, awe, and wonder, say, at the beauty and intricacy of the created order. It might be closer to what we experience in the face of what the Romantics called the sublime.

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Contemplation And Depression

I recently watched a video of two spiritual directors discussing how the role of the spiritual director is different from the clergyman. Whereas the clergyman is communicating established truths and doctrine, a spiritual director’s job is to help us to be attentive to the God’s action in the moment, to pay attention to that which wants to become manifested in us.

Contemplation and Depression

One of the aspects of ourselves that changes as we continue on the contemplative path is our relationship to time, specifically psychological time. That is, our regret or nostalgia about the past and our hopes or anxieties about the future gradually dissolve more and more as we learn to truly attend to the present moment.

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